Study Shows ‘Mom Shaming’ Won’t Ever Go Away Because There’s a Reason We Do It

If you’re a mom, chances are you’ve experienced some kind of mom shaming. From feeding choices to the working mom vs. stay-at-home mom “debate” (quotes are there because c’mon, let’s be real: most moms don’t have a real “choice” about staying home or working because either child care is too expensive or bills don’t care if you want to stay home all day either) to the constant struggle of helicoptering or free-range parenting, it seems like when it comes to parenting, everyone has an opinion.

But not a new study says that mom shaming may have a scientific basis to it and has a lot to do with the fact that as moms? Most of us are worried that we have no idea what we’re doing in the first place.

mom holding little baby
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This is why mom shaming might never go away.

Mom Shaming Study

mom and baby
Credit: Shutterstock

A study out of Michigan by the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health looked at  475 mothers of moms with young children. To be eligible for the study, moms had to have at least one child under the age of 5, presumably because for some reason, most of the time the mom shaming is happening with moms with little kids.

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And the study’s results were not surprising: they found that every 6 out of 10 moms reported being shamed for their parenting choices. And who’s doing the shaming? Most of the time, it was their family or very close friends.

Newborn baby crying
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It’s frustrating to see the results so clear as day in a scientific study, even though as a mom, I’ve definitely experienced mom shaming in real life. But still, when you’re going through it, you tend to think that you’re the exception, not the rule. 

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Chaunie Brusie

Chaunie Brusie is a freelance writer, former magazine editor, author, mom of four, and a registered nurse with experience in OB, long-term and step-down care.

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